Saturday, July 16, 2011

Guess What Vitamin C from FOOD does for you?

Main Image
These tomatoes just make you want to eat them. They're gorgeous, and go perfectly with some Mozz cheese/basil/olive oil/basalmic ... dude. 


I could eat them on a train, I could eat them in the rain, I could eat them on a boat, I could eat them with a goat ....


Besides the ability to quote Green Eggs and Ham, another reason foods like tomatoes are important to take a look at ... to view ... to EYEBALL ... is because of their effects on cataracts.


Vitamin C from food tied to lower cataract risk | Reuters



What Happened
In this study, researchers evaluated more than 5,600 Indian  (from India, not Oklahoma) adults age 60 and up for cataracts. They also interviewed them about their diets and lifestyle habits, and measured their blood levels of vitamin C.

What They Found
Overall, nearly 73 percent of the study participants were found to have cataracts. But that risk dipped as vitamin C blood levels and vitamin C intake rose.

The Bottom Line
In the roughly one-quarter of older adults with the highest vitamin C levels, the risk of cataract was 39 percent lower than in people with the lowest levels of the nutrient. That was with factors like income, smoking habits, high blood pressure and diabetes taken into account.
Look into your future and see the positive benefits of a vitamin C Foods -- otherwise, you just may not be able to. 
To help you out, CLICK HERE to check out this list of the very best food sources of vitamin C. 


Will Clower AudiclesWill Clower Recipes
For more information: Click here to visit Will Clower's website.

Food Sources of Vitamin C

The best source of your vitamins and nutrients comes from FOOD. 


In the form of pills and supplements and powders and polyjuice potions, vitamin C doesn't act the same way in your body as it does in the form of food. 


Click HERE to see the massive study showing the biggest fail of Vitamin C supplementation.  

So if you're not going to pop pills -- and you do need Vitamin C in your life ... what should you include in your diet? 


Here are the foods that have the highest sources of vitamin C :

  • Cantaloupe
  • Citrus fruits and juices, such as orange and grapefruit
  • Kiwi fruit
  • Mango
  • Papaya
  • Pineapple
  • Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, cranberries
  • Watermelon
Vegetables that are the highest sources of vitamin C include:
  • Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower
  • Green and red peppers
  • Spinach, cabbage, turnip greens, and other leafy greens
  • Sweet and white potatoes
  • Tomatoes and tomato juice
  • Winter squash



Will Clower Audicles Will Clower Recipes
For more information: Click here to visit Will Clower's website.

RadioWill: Back in the saddle

I'm back from my Mediterranean vacation and ready to go!! From Noon - 1:00 EST this Saturday I will be talking about what while I was away, the health news of the week, and my special guest Dian Griesel who co-authored the book "Turbocharged".   

NO bread. NO grains. NO breakfast. 


Listen to this interview live (CLICK HERE to listen live) and let me know your thoughts on their approach!! Is it "smash or trash"?? Let me know email: info@willclower.com or call me on the show 412.333.1360



Will Clower Audicles Will Clower Recipes
For more information: Click here to visit Will Clower's website.

Friday, July 15, 2011

21 Ways French Women Stay Thin | Health, Beauty, Fashion, Love, Careers and more - MORE Magazine

spa thalassotherapy salt water bath woman french france picture
This is an article I contributed to in MORE Magazine ... with some very interesting observations from a lot of well known authors.  


Check it out and let me know your thoughts!!
Will


21 Ways French Women Stay Thin | Health, Beauty, Fashion, Love, Careers and more - MORE Magazine

Will Clower AudiclesWill Clower Recipes
For more information: Click here to visit Will Clower's website.

How Can Health Authorities Be SO Wrong About Water?

You have to drink AT LEAST 8, 8 ounce glasses of water ... per day. That's what we were told and coached to do by the people who are supposed to provide "evidence-based" science.
This article pubbed in the British Medical Journal (to read it, click here) just adds to the frustration of most people who want sensible nutrition advice. Margaret McCartney is a Scottish physician who is pointing out that we have no credible scientific evidence supporting this advice. 
No scientific evidence? So how, then, did it get into our canons of nutritional advice within every major health organization? Do they VET the advice they dole out? Do they check to see if there is, in fact, any evidence for it? 
Not in this case, apparently. Dartmouth Medical School physician Dr. Heinz Valtin also said just last month that there aren't any scientific studies supporting the eight-glasses-a-day rule and that, to date, he hasn't seen any additional evidence that would confirm the recommendation. 
Dr. Valtin published a review of the literature in the American Journal of Physiology. (if you want to read his excellent review article that dismembers the 8x8 idea, click)
From The GuardianDrinking extra water is said to reduce urinary tract infections, improve skin tone, help with weight loss (fill up with water first), reduce headaches and fatigue, eliminate constipation and improve concentration. There's no robust evidence for any of this. The kidneys are wonderful things (that don't need flushing with lots of water) and will make concentrated urine to save water.
Dartmouth Medical School physician Dr. Heinz Valtin also told The Huffington Post last month that there aren't any scientific studies supporting the eight-glasses-a-day rule and that, to date, he hasn't seen any additional evidence that would confirm the recommendation. Valtin published a review of the literature in the American Journal of Physiology





Will Clower Audicles Will Clower Recipes
For more information: Click here to visit Will Clower's website.

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Do Cellphones Cause Brain Tumors? Definitely Maybe Not.


A few years ago, a research study showed a possible link between cell phone usage and brain cancer. They wanted to list radiofrequency energy as "possibly carcinogenic". 


Everyone freaked. 


Now, a flurry of studies have been done and completed to show no linkage at all between them. Not even a little bit. 


Just look at data from the study posted today! Researchers looked at more than 2.8 million adults -- 2.8 million!! -- and found that those who'd used a cellphone for 11 to 15 years were no more likely than newer users or non-users to develop an acoustic neuroma (they kind of brain cancer they are most worried about).


Does this mean that there couldn't be some long term, slowly growing, sneaky stealth tumor that could be formed when people use the cell phone chronically for periods longer that 11 - 15 years? Nope. But, these results are pretty strong to say that, so far, there is in fact no linkage between cell phone usage and brain cancer.  


Key points to keep in mind (from the Nat'l Cancer Institute). 



Key Points

  • 1. Cell phones emit radiofrequency energy. Concerns have been raised that this energy from cell phones may pose a cancer risk to users.
  • 2. Radiofrequency energy is a form of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation; exposure depends upon the technology of the phone, distance between the phone’s antenna and the user, the extent and type of use, and distance of the user from base stations.
  • 3. Researchers are studying tumors of the brain and central nervous system and other sites of the head and neck because cell phones are typically held next to the head when used.
  • 4. Research studies have not shown a consistent link between cell phone use and cancer. A large international study (Interphone) published in 2010 found that, overall, cell phone users are at lower risk for two of the most common types of brain tumorglioma andmeningioma―compared to non-users. For the small proportion of study participants who reported the most total time on cell phone calls, there was some increased risk of glioma, but the researchers considered this finding inconclusive.
  • 5. Further research is needed to investigate possible health effects in children and persons who have used cell phones heavily for many years. 

No link seen between cellphones, brain tumor | Reuters

Will Clower ArticlesWill Clower Audicles

Search This Blog